Clark County, Ohio

History and Genealogy



Springfield in 1852

From Directory of the City of Springfield
John W. Kees & Co., Springfield. 1852


MILLS, FACTORIES AND FOUNDRIES.

The first mill erected within the present city limits, was a small grist mill by Jas. Demint, on the spot now occupied by Dr. Gillett's mill.

In 1807, Robert Rennick built a flouring mill on Buck creek, where "Bechtle's old mill" was formerly situated. This was the first mill of any considerable benefit to this place.

In 1809 John Lingle and Jacob Cook built a powder mill a little north of the present paper mill.

A cotton factory, built by Maddox Fisher, in 1813, took the place of Demint's old mill, and continued operations a few years, when it was changed into a flouring mill. The building of this factory seemed to have marked a turning point in the history of Springfield. Little business was doing, (there being but one store in the place at the time,) the inhabitants appeared discouraged — real estate depreciated, and hard times were complained of; but the building of this factory gave a new impetus to trade and improvements. Mr. Fisher was a man of some capital, and did much by his influence and wealth in the early improving of this place.

The present paper mill, on Mill run, near its junction with Buck creek, was commenced about the 20th of August, 1827, by Messrs. Blount, Lowry and Kills, and went into operation June 20, 1828. Messrs. Kills & Sons became its proprietors in 1832.

On January 1st, 1840, Mr. James Leffel completed the first foundry in the vicinity of this city. It was situated near the Buck creek bridge, on the National road, west of Springfield; but being found inadequate for the increasing patronage, he commenced building the present foundry on Buck creek, in June, 1845, and finished it the following spring. Mr. Leffel has procured several patents for useful inventions; among them are his "Buckeye cooking stove," "water wheel" and "lever jack."

In April, 1841, Messrs. S. and J. Barnett commenced the erection of their large and substantial mill, at the north end of Limestone street. The entire gearing of this mill is composed of iron; it has five run of burrs, and turns out over one hundred barrels of flour per day. The water power for this mill, constructed by Messrs. Barnett, has a fall of 24 feet, and is sufficient at the lowest stages of water to propel eighteen run of stone. Quite a number of manufacturing establishments have been built on this power, viz: Leffel's cotton mill in 1846, Smith and Boucher's oil mill in 1847, Christie and Muzzy's flooring mill in 1847, Rabbitts and Old's woolen factory in 1847, Pitts' machine shop in 1848, besides one or two saw mills. There are also two flouring mills on Mill run, one owned by Filler and Boggs and the other by Dr. Gillett, and an extensive foundry carried on by Hatch and Whiteley.