Clark County, Ohio

History and Genealogy



Clark County's Civil War Soldiers

From The History of Clark County, Ohio
Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1881


UNITED STATES REGULAR ARMY


The following is Clark County's contribution of officers to the regular army of the United States. It is not claimed that this is a complete list, as there are no accessible records by which it can be corrected. The names have been collected, one at a time, from various sources, and the individual record has been verified, in each case, by reference to the Army Register:

Robert L. Kilpatrick, * Colonel U.S.A., retired. Captain to Lieutenant Colonel Volunteers, Captain to Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Veteran Reserve Corps, Captain Forty-Second Infantry, Brevet Major, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel; Colonel, December, 1870.

Edwin C. Mason, Major Twenty-first Infantry, Colonel Maine Volunteers, 1861; Colonel Ohio Volunteers, 1864; Brevet Brigadier General of Volunteers, 1865. See also Company F, Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, now in service.

John P. Sanderson, * Colonel Thirteenth Infantry, Provost Marshal at St. Louis, Mo.; died October 14, 1864; buried in Fern Cliff.

Simon H. Drum, Captain Fourth Artillery; killed in the assault on the city of Mexico, September 13, 1847; buried in Fern Cliff.

William F. Drum, Captain and Brevet Major Second Infantry, Colonel of Volunteers, now in service.

Wilber F. Cummings, Captain Fifteenth Infantry; died October 2, 1867; buried in Fern Cliff. See also Forty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Andrew J. Williamson, First Lieutenant Third Infantry; resigned, 1851.

Finley O. Cummings, Captain and Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers; by appointment of the President, July, 1865; mustered out September 18, 1865. See also Second and Forty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Charles W. Hotsenpiller, Captain Nineteenth Infantry; appointed from the army August 10, 1863, where he had risen through every grade from Private to First Sergeant; retired, 1879.

George K. Sanderson, * Captain Eleventh Infantry, now in service.

Oscar D. Ladley, First Lieutenant Twenty-second Infantry, Company E, Sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company E, Sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; private to Captain Seventy-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Second Lieutenant Twenty-second United States Infantry, pd; died in service, January 11, 1880.

Isaac N. Walter, First Lieutenant Sixth Cavalry. See also Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and Forty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry; retired, 1870.

William H. Vinal, First Lieutenant Sixteenth Ohio Independent Battery, now in service.

Frank S. Rice, First Lieutenant of First Artillery; graduated from the Military Academy in June, 1874, now in service.

William Galloway, late Captain Fifteenth Infantry.


UNITED STATES REGULAR NAVY

Reed Werden, Rear Admiral, retired; appointed from Ohio in 1834; a son of William Werden, the famous old landlord.

Joseph N. Miller, Commander; appointed from Ohio in 1851; a son of Esquire Ruben Miller, and brother of Judge John C. Miller.

Isaac C. Strain, Lieutenant; appointed to the Naval Academy about 1836; died and was buried at Panama in 18—. Lieut. Strain was in command of the United States Exploring Expedition across the Isthmus of Darien in 1854. The party was composed of twenty-seven men, including officers, engineers, astronomers, etc. The route was from Caledonia Bay, on the Atlantic side, to Darien Harbor, on the Pacific. Only ten day's provisions were taken, as the journey was supposed to be only a "tramp" of thirty or forty miles. Being misled by what purported to be the official report of a former English expedition, which proved to be entirely fictitious, the party became lost in the impenetrable jungles and swamps of the country; a great number of them perished of starvation, bites of poisonous insects and fatigue. For a full account of this expedition, the reader is referred to Harper's Monthly Magazine, Vol. x, 1855.

Andrew F. Boggs, Civil Engineer, entered the service as Quarter Master's Clerk during the Mexican war; was appointed as Assistant Engineer in the United States Coast Survey; wass one of the special engineers in Strain's Darien Expedition. He died from hunger and fatigue at Panama, in April, 1854. Mr. Boggs was one of the engineers engaged upon the early railroads of this county, and was at one time an assistant in the office of Col. Thomas Kizer. He was half-brother to Biddle Boggs, of Springfield.

Clarence S. Williams, Naval Cadet, entered the Naval Academy, September, 1880, now in service.


Did not enter the service from this county; but are at present residents of, or are so closely connected with the affairs of the county as to fairly involve them in its history.